The Martian moon Phobos and Deimos Phobos and Deimos bear more resemblance to

  • Pranabjyoti Das
The Martian moon Phobos and Deimos Phobos and Deimos bear more resemblance to asteroids than to Earth's moon. Both are tiny and the larger, Phobos, is only 22 kilometers, while the smaller, Deimos, is only 13 km making them some of the smallest moons in the solar system. Both are also made up of material that resembles Type I or II carbonaceous chondrites, the substance that makes up asteroids. With their elongated shapes, they even look more like asteroids than moons. Even from Mars, the moons don't look like moons. The more distant moon, Deimos, appears more like a star in the night sky. When it is full and shining at its brightest, it resembles Venus as seen on Earth. Phobos has the closest orbit to its primary of any moon in the solar system. Phobos orbits only 3,700 miles (6,000 km) from the Martian ground. Its surface is marred by debris that may have come from impacts on Mars. It travels around the planet three times a day, zipping across the Martian sky approximately once every four hours. At times, an observer on the surface would be unable to see the moon because of the curvature of the planet. The fast-flying moon appears to travel from west to east. Deimos orbits much farther away, tending to stay 12,470 miles (20,069 km) from the red planet's surface. The moon takes about 30 hours, a little over a Martian day, to travel around its host. http://www.space.com/9976-martian-moons-pair.html

The Martian moon Phobos and Deimos Phobos and Deimos bear more resemblance to asteroids than to Earth's moon. Both are tiny and the larger, Phobos, is only 22 kilometers, while the smaller, Deimos, is only 13 km making them some of the smallest moons in the solar system. Both are also made up of material that resembles Type I or II carbonaceous chondrites, the substance that makes up asteroids. With their elongated shapes, they even look more like asteroids than moons. Even from Mars, the moons don't look like moons. The more distant moon, Deimos, appears more like a star in the night sky. When it is full and shining at its brightest, it resembles Venus as seen on Earth. Phobos has the closest orbit to its primary of any moon in the solar system. Phobos orbits only 3,700 miles (6,000 km) from the Martian ground. Its surface is marred by debris that may have come from impacts on Mars. It travels around the planet three times a day, zipping across the Martian sky approximately once every four hours. At times, an observer on the surface would be unable to see the moon because of the curvature of the planet. The fast-flying moon appears to travel from west to east. Deimos orbits much farther away, tending to stay 12,470 miles (20,069 km) from the red planet's surface. The moon takes about 30 hours, a little over a Martian day, to travel around its host. http://www.space.com/9976-martian-moons-pair.html

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